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. but because if you stop an economy growing, then it leaves more people out of work claiming benefits, not paying taxes. businesses struggle so they're not paying taxes. and as a result borrowing goes up. borrowing not to invest in schools, in hospitals, transport and education. but borrowing to keep people idle. so the next time you hear a conservative say to you labour would increase borrowing, just remember it is this government that is increasing borrowing this year. [applause] so what have we seen? we've seen recession, higher unemployment, higher borrowing. people think that's what were promised. now look there will be some people who say, and this is an important argument, they'll be some people who say, well there is short-term pain but it is worth it for the long-term gain. but i'm afraid the opposite is true. you see that the longer you have low growth in our country the bigger the debt hole becomes for the future and the bigger our problems will be in the future. the longer a young person is out of work that is not just bad for their prospects now; it is bad for their prosp
in infrastructure, if we level the playing field, we will grow the economy. frankly, we have a ball and chain. it is congress. congress is holding us back. we need to change congress in two ways. we people who are more fiscally responsible. when the people who know the basics of how to work together. you will hear these things a lot tonight in my comments. i was the governor who drew top tax fraud. i had to cut $5 billion from the state budget, including my own salary. i'm the only governor in modern times who left the office with a smaller general fund budget and when i started. i know how to be fiscally responsible. my opponent when into the united states senate in 2001 with the biggest surplus in the united states and six years later left with massive deficits. during his time in the senate, the national debt went up by $16,000. he conceded that spending was a problem in the senate. we also have people who need to know how to work together. i learned to cut crime bills and the economy. my opponent said his job was to not democrats softly. he took this similar position in the senate, fighti
, how would you describe the jobs economy and right now? guest: this is the weakest recovery we have had since world war ii. the jobs numbers each month, we have averaged around 145,000 jobs created per month this year. that is barely enough to keep up with the growth of the working age population. and it has been a somewhat brazilian recovery in that there have been a lot of fears that we would go back into recession at various times and that has not happened. the overall economy has grown roughly 2% since the recession ended in june, 2009. that is a fairly weak growth rate, particularly after the death of the recession. by many measures, this is easily the worst since the great depression corporate -- the great depression. the modest and sometimes weak growth we have had has made it very difficult for the unemployed. we have long-term unemployed, those are of work for six months or even a year, that has been a record -- at record levels. ben bernanke has long term crashes -- the prices of long- term unemployment. -- the crisis of long-term unemployment. host: let's begin with a call fr
and the greatest peacetime expansion of our economy in the nation's history. by contrast, the decade checked by bush tax rates squandered our budget surpluses, produced net- jobs and culminated in the great recession. the lesson here is that the contrary -- is that contrary to supply-side economics, the level of the top rate does not by itself dictate what happens to gdp. a balanced budget aided by increased revenues just might restore confidence to investors and jump-start our economy. for the third and final element of this tax reform model, we turn to investment income. it is time to reduce the sizable differential and the tax treatment of earned and unearned income. the reduction in the capital gains rate to 15% under president bush was a major contributor to the growth and wealth disparities we see today. the top 1% on average received 20% of incoming capital gains, 10 times as much as the rest of the country. capital gains makes up 60% of the income recorded by the forbes 400. the extremely low 50% rate in effect today is an allied air. it is the lowest rate on investment income since
. that promise is rapidly slipping away because our economy is on the wrong track. 170,000 people woke up in our state this morning without a job. we can get our economy back on track if we get our people back to work. i have a plan to do that. i have been there. i've been bankrupt. i've lost everything and i have been able to come back. that's what we need a -- that's what we need to do. the plans my opponent has support in washington has only made things worse. you can look it a path for someone who has created millions of jobs or you can look at the path for someone who's going to push the economy of the fiscal cliff. >> thank you very much and thank you to channel three. i'm looking forward to this morning. i am a product of connecticut possible class. my grandfather worked in the factories of new britain, my mother is a retired schoolteacher. i was raised to believe i need to live my life in a way to stand up for the bill class families of the state that has meant so much to my family. i passed the connecticut stem cell law which is saving lives and putting people to work. i went to congres
before the crisis hit. but today's news certainly is not an excuse to try to talk down the economy to score a few political points. it's a reminder that this country has come too far to turn back now. [applause] because of your strength and resilience, the strength and resilience of the american people, we've made too much progress to return to the policies that led to the crisis in the first place. i can't allow that to happen. i won't allow that to happen. and that is why i'm running for a second term as president of the united states! [cheers and applause] i have seen too much pain, seen too much struggle to let this country get hit with another round of top-down economics. one of the main reasons we had this crisis is because big banks on wall street were allowed to make big bets with other people's money and governor romney wants to roll back the rules we put in place to stop that behavior? that's not going to happen. that is not going to happen. [applause] one of the main reasons record surpluses under bill clinton were turned into record deficits under george bush is because
to trust us. so while hot spots are growing abroad, the economy is not growing here at home. that is the problem we have to focus on here. you see, the economy is growing slower than it grew last year. last year it grew slower than the year before. all president obama has offered as more of the same. we have a very big choice to make. that choice is clear. do we want more stagnation that fosters dependency or do we want a dynamic, growing economy that creates opportunity and creates jobs? [cheers and applause] in a nutshell, we need leadership. [cheers] look at the guy over my shoulder right here. if you look at this man's life story, one word comes to mind. leader. this is a man who turned around the olympics, who turned around struggling businesses, and by the way, being successful in business, that is a good thing. there is nothing wrong with that. we want more people to be successful. we want more people to have prosperity, to have jobs, to have higher take-home pay. we want people to grow. in a jobs crisis, wouldn't it be nice to have a job-creator in the white house? t
? the choice is clear. a stagnant economy that promotes more government dependency, or a dynamic growing economy that provides opportunity and jobs. mitt romney and i will not duck the tough issues. we will not blame others for the next four years. we will take responsibility. we will not try to replace our founding principles. we will reapply our founding principles. the choice is clear. the choice rests with you. we ask you for your vote. thank you. >> thank you both again. thank you very much. this concludes the vice- presidential debate. please tune in next tuesday for the second presidential debate in new york. i do hope all of you go to the polls. have a good evening. [applause] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [applause] , livem tonight's debate reaction for the next hour. it is just past 1:00 eastern time in the morning. we are taking your tweets. you can join us on facebook. we will get to your calls in a couple of minutes. [applause] >> as the vice president the parts, along with paul ryan and their
because our economy is on the wrong track. 170,000 people woke up been arrested this morning without a job. if we can get our economy back on track, we can get our people back to work. i have a way to do that. i have been there. i have been bankrupt. i have lost everything. and i have been able to come back. that is what we need to do. my opponent has no plans and the policies in washington have only made things worse. you can have a path to create millions of jobs or you can have the path where someone is when to push our economy off a fiscal cliff. >> i really looking forward to this morning. i am a product of connecticut. i was raised to believe that i needed to live my life in a way to stand up to the -- for the middle-class families. that is why i passed the connecticut's them sell law, which is saving lives and the people to work. i went to congress to stand for manufacturing and fight outsourcing. that is me. that is my story. it is a very different story from the demands. over and over again, she has shown as she stands up for herself and her profits at the expense of the people th
of the u.s. housing market. coming up, a discussion on the economy and campaign 2012. the u.s. chamber of commerce and business roundtable. they look at what they see as the most important business issues this election cycle. you can see it live, starting at 8:30 eastern, on c-span 2. today, a look at the obama administration's aid to the auto industry. the former lead adviser on the auto industry will be live, starting at 9:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span 3. this month, as the presidential candidates meet for debate, we are asking middle and high school students to send a message to the presidency. students will answer the question, what is the most important issue the president should consider in 2013? there is a grand prize of $25,000. -- $5,000. for complete details and rules, go online to studentcam.org. >> in a foreign-policy speech, mr. khamenei said that president obama is a passive in the middle east chris it is time to change course in the regent. -- region. foreign policy will be the focus of the third presidential debate on october 22nd. this is 30 minutes. congressman goodlatte
that the economy is a top issue, you run into a risk of focusing on too many items as opposed to jobs and economic issues. host: there will also be a foreign policy debate coming up on october 22. is this a sort of preview of that debate? will this be a preview for the obama camp to see what they will be talking about, coming up? caller: it will be a chance for governor romney to do a preview, yes. the thing that i think occurred many times before, romney camp -- came out and named a lot of these things fairly forcefully. from what we saw yesterday, this will be an even stronger reputation of his view on those issues. getting out on the campaign trail at these paul ryan events, particularly when it comes to the issue of things like foreign aid and how this country deals with the resources when it comes to other places, we do not exactly see that relationship being reciprocal. it is something that has gotten a surprising amount of attention on the trail over the last few weeks. it could be an area where the mitt romney campaign is looking forward as they decided to hold this speech. host: one piece
the global economy is critical. europe is our largest export market, and it is in a slow decline that will go on for some time. china finds europe as their largest export market. we have an extraordinary relationship with china, with our exports. all of this is under challenge. the fundamental issue is to understand if we get rid of uncertainty, if we step up in a clear way and decide what we're going to do about our unemployment by using energy, by expanding tourism, by working hard to change our regulatory system, and if we face the fundamental realities, we can fix this. we only need one thing. we need leadership in the white house and congress. we need leadership in the business community. >> can this come significantly down? >> you asked if this is the new normal. >> that is the choice americans are going to make on election day. i think most americans would say no. the american spirit is alive and well. that will help us grow the economy. but you have to look at some fundamentals. for manufacturers it is more expensive than any other country in the world. that is after you take out the
get this balanced budget. we must get this debt under control. this debt not only hurts our economy today with the threat of higher interest rates and a losing a dollar and much higher tax rates. we know that we are giving the students here at this academy, our children and grandchildren, a lower standard of living. we've never done that in this country before. host: vice-presidential candidate paul ryan in new hampshire at a recent event. here's what you might hear from the vice-president joe biden at tonight's debate. this is from a recent campaign stop in florida. [video clip] >> there is no quit in america, folks. ladies and gentlemen, that's why i know i'm not the only one who was offended to hear governor romney write off nearly half the country is in his statement about 47% of the people being dependent. if you read the book congressman ryan has written with two other leading young members of the republican party, they talk about -- the title of the book is "young guns," and they talk about this culture of dependency in america without acknowledging that all those people -- o
to "washington journal." as campaign 2012 hits its final month, the presidential candidates are using the economy to frame their vision for the future and what they would do for the american dream. we saw a jobs numbers that showed an unproven unemployment rate. we would like to hear your opinions. has the american dream been downsized? you can also share your opinion on social media. send us a tweet by writing @cspanwj. you can also join the conversation on facebook. or you can e-mail us. the front page of "the washington post"looks out with the call life of a salesman. he always finds to -- he always seems to find optimism in the worst of circumstances. here is another chance. the story profiles this man building and installing pools. how he had to downsize his business, cut employees, and work even harder to find jobs. let's take a look at the content. it says -- what do you think? has the picture of the american dream changed? national journal took a look it how americans are perceiving the economic situation right now, not just on a national level but on the personal lives, too. in a heartla
of the u.s. economy. different parts of the country, different industries, places where we are really strong, places where we need to be stronger. it really is trying to find that bridge between basic research and development and the financing to get things commercialize. it is experimenting, trying to find those ways. is really different from what the romney campaign -- the romney campaign has not really talked about this at all. is really private sector- private-sector. >> when you hear public-private partnership, what is your first thought? >> again, i think it goes into defining the role of government. their government -- the government has had a long and successful history with research and development funding. particularly basic research were there is not an economic or business incentive engaged in research. the government can go a long way through collaboration with universities. i think the trouble is where you define that and what is the government's's role in the partnership? -- what is the government's role in the partnership? very often companies come in and look at money
the inevitable ups and downs of incoming data, it appears the economy is growing at such a pace that absent policy action, progress, and reducing unemployment will likely be so for some time. in the meantime inflation is subdued, running at or below our long-run objective of 2%, while longer run inflation expectations remain well anchored. the federal funds rate were 3%, we would have in my view an open and shut case for lowering it. the complication, of course, is that the funds is at its lower bound which means we can't turn that dial further. we have to use unconventional tools such as land guidance about the future path of the funds rate. with respect to lsaps, my belief, this echos the views that chairman bernanke expressed at jackson hole, is that prior rounds of lsaps have placed a significant role in supporting activity and in preventing a worrisome undershoot of our inflation objective. the case is especially strong with respect to the first round of lsaps which was a very potent piece of policy action that helped to bring the economy back from the brink in 2009. however, we now fa
here in the hall tonight and from online have to do with the american economy and, in fact, with global economic conditions. i understand that you flipped a coin. and, senator obama, you will begin tonight. and we're going to have our first question from over here in section a from alan schaefer. alan? >> with the economy on the downturn and retired and older citizens and workers losing their incomes, what's the fastest, most positive solution to bail these people out of the economic ruin? >> well, alan, thank you very much for the question. i want to first, obviously, thank belmont university, tom, thank you, and to all of you who are participating tonight and those of you who sent e-mail questions in. i think everybody knows now we are in the worst financial crisis since the great depression. and a lot of you, i think, are worried about your jobs, your pensions, your retirement accounts, your ability to send your child or your grandchild to college. and i believe this is a final verdict on the failed economic policies of the last eight years, strongly promoted by president bush and su
ideas and maybe learning some new things. this is going to cover a wide range of topics from the economy to foreign economy. joining me are three panelists. first, my co-hosts. >> there will be no opening statements. that will weaken the right to the questions and answers. there will be a 62nd closing statement. the candidates will each have 20 seconds to answer and then a reach for rebuttal. we do have timekeepers. they will signal when it is up. they will determine which candidate will start the debate. mr. murphy will go first in answering the first question. mr. murphy will go first we get to the closing statements. there were chosen by the hartford courant. the audience here has promised to remain quiet and attentive up with no cheering or jeering and no applause or outburst set any kind during this debate. that takes more time away from learning something about these candidates. let's begin. our first topic is the nation's economy. lori peres will be asking the perce. >> you talked a lot about protecting american manufacturing jobs. your opponent has criticized you for not having a
country, and that is jobs in the economy. congressman murphy doesn't have a plan. yes not put a plan fourth to address these issues. you can look online and see exactly what i plan to do. they now have a track record of creating jobs and adding to the economy and they know i'm going to take that skill set to washington in a congress where we have so few business people who come from the private sector. blacks why can't the press come along and monitor this -- >> why can't the press, along and monitor this question are >> the press does come along. >> this campaign is about the people of the state of connecticut. i ran into a guy just a couple of weeks ago, and out of work painter and he wants to know the differences between linda and i between how we're going to put him back on the job. they're big differences. when the's plan is focused on giving herself a $7 million tax cut and hoping that trickles down to people who need help. my plan is focused on investing in the people of this state and funding our schools and building roads and bridges and we recognize the strength of our nati
in every year. that's the way to do it. set priorities, make cuts but also grow the economy. >> now time for our closing statements and by the order of coin flip, mr. allen, you go first. >> well, thank you for the opportunity to have this debate and thank you all again for watching. there's a lot at stake in this election. it's a pivotal election but it's going to determine the trajectory of our country. whether there will be changes in the united states senate, if tim is in, he will be in there for the same folks he's campaigning for all of these years when he was chair of the democratic national committee, ignoring the needs, dire needs of people in virginia. i want to see change in washington, those positive, constructive ideas that can get this country going in the right direction. i believe we ought to get united behind the mission of sending a message to the world that america is open for business again. i think that anybody who pays taxes should be on our side unless you want to pay higher taxes. if you use electricity, you ought on our side. if you want more affordable electrici
know that he cares about women and he cares about making the economy good for women and he cares that these past four years have been the most difficult on women. more women have become unemployed than men in the last four years. you also know that more women have fallen into poverty in the last four years. i know that we need to have women out there understand at thatmitt is a person cares and will work harder than anyone, that will be there, and he will not fail. host: the question is whether political spouses affect your vote. kathy in fort worth, texas, republican line. caller: good morning. my name is actually jackie. i am a mother. i'm not wealthy or educated. i went to high school. i have three sons and two grandchildren. i think it's wonderful to hear their spouse talk about them. it makes me see a different perspective in their personal lives. so i think it's good. host: what is it in particular that you like hearing from the wives of the candidates? is it their personal stories? is it them talking about their families or their professional experiences? caller: i think i
for hundreds of jobs. i just got a job so i believe the economy is getting better. host: you start a job on monday? what kind of industry? caller: it will be in health care. host: what does that mean? caller: where they deliver medical supplies and you take them to the hospital for distribution and delivery. host: what kind of money we make now compared to what you made in the past? caller: is not a pay cut but it is safe -- it is not a big pay cut, but it is a pay cut. host: so it's full-time work? caller: yes. host: what are the benefits like? caller: decent. host: you start monday -- john, tallahassee, florida is up next, hello. caller: hello, how are you doing? host: fine, thank you. caller: when you take all the jobs overseas, we cannot go overseas and work. that means someone will be unemployed. i think we need to make a demand of the entire planet and work towards creating the supply. i also think they should focus more on helping the small businesses -- financing small businesses which is creating more jobs than big business. i also would like to say that there is a lot of repeti
start, i want to thank the mayor for your endorsement and support. thank you both for coming. economy. the whole race is about that. we held one of our first jobs fares here because we want to connect people with jobs. when you put a title on a bill in washington that says jobs bill, you have to read the bill. those bills in particular were rejected in a bipartisan manner, and that means democrats and republicans recognize that by taking for under $50 billion in taxes out of the private sector and giving it to washington to increase government spending, that is not the answer. the best answer is to come and put the money in the communities. i went down there today and he did not say, thank you for coming. please take this money and bring it back to washington. he said, go back to washington and tell them they need a reality check. we are tired of the overspending and the taxing and taking more money out of the economy. there are real challenges here. i used to live here. i worked and i lived over there. i understand. many businesses are hurting right now. regulatory tax uncertainty is
in this campaign and those stark terms. i would say the greatest rank of the american economy and the culture has been that we have been the best at adapting to change, at adapting to rapid james. i think this fact of three plus decades of having lost ground economically makes people fear the future instead of embracing it. when you fear the future, then that adaptability goes. that is why i would say that one of the big boys and which we have changed and which we are weaker than we have been. >> one final thought on that. one thing that has surprised me in the last cycle of the recession is that there has not be more talk of protectionism. that gives me a little hope that both parties realize that they kind of 1930's solution to retraction of the economy is really worse than what you would otherwise do. >> to have attended to running at a very hard line against china and taking a tough stand against china. that is actually a switch. the head the republican taking a harder line against trade. >> there maybe some specifics that need to be pursued it. the broader political system is not generating
-you to a keen observer on washington politics and the economy, as well who as a great moderator. and thank you to our panelists. we really appreciate you all being here. i would also like to again thank our sponsors at bloomberg government, the roth political report -- and a reminder that if you enjoyed today, we do this for state of the industry conferences. a reminder -- in four weeks, election day will be held. a couple of days afterward, we will have a major event at the chamber, on the morning of november 8. we hope you will mark our -- mark your calendars and join us. thank you very much, and have a great day. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> both presidential candidates are in ohio, with rallies this afternoon. mitt romney is a kind of false -- is at the falls. the president fifth event at ohio state university will start shortly. meanwhile, a discussion of how the presidential race shapes up. >> we will be getting electoral scoreboard updates from a lot of publications. today, we feature "the
on taxes, the economy, foreign policy, if you like. share portions of the debate with those in your community. you are welcome to do that on c- span.org and book for our debate held. tomorrow, the candidates are on the campaign trail. vice president biden with joe biden will be in wisconsin at 2:45 eastern time. paul ryan will be with mitt romney in lancaster, ohio, at 5:40 p.m. both of them will be airing on c-span. right now, it is time for us to play, in its entirety, tonight's presidential visit vice- presidential debate in kentucky. -- tonight's vice presidential debate in kentucky. i am martha raddatz. i am honored to moderate this debate between the two men who have dedicated much of their lives to public service. it is divided between domestic and foreign policy issues. i will move back and forth between foreign and domestic. we will have nine different segments. at the beginning of each segment, i will ask both candidates a question and they will each have two minutes to answer. i will encourage discussion between the candidate with follow-up question. it has been determine
with their fairs, so we can develop geothermal energy and boost our economy. and the way we're going to go about doing it is public/private partnerships with local input and authority so that we can come together and stop this bickering and attack talk and all this other stuff that congresswoman bono mack is so adept at and skilled, but really come up with some problem-solving solutions. and that's what's missing in congress, and that's what's missing in congresswoman bono mack. >> all right, thank you, dr. ruiz. congresswoman, you have one minute. >> thank you. first of all, let me go to this constant bickering that i'm hearing about bickering. you have done nothing, dr. ruiz, at all to take responsibility. you haven't even had a plan for the sea until now that it's been asked of you. clearly you don't understand the complexities of the sea. i would love to know what your thoughts are on the quantification settlement agreement. how do we take control from the state of california? this is what it's all about, dr. ruiz. i and others, including partners like senator feinstein, senator denise due c
into the economy. about $150 a week more for white womenton average, for women of color somewhere between $250 and $350. and it would be injected into the economy. we are going to spend it and it is going to create jobs. so wherever we look, i think we see what's at stake because, of course, the folks that would have to pay that equal pay don't want to pay it. women are in the world at large are the single greatest source of cheap labor and unpaid labor and that is a source of rstens, right. and we are also the means of reproduction. hello, if we were not the means of reproduction, we would be fine because it is necessary to nationalism, there are only two pill lars of nationalism, controlling territory and population. it is necessary for our means and cheap labor, it is necessary to control reproduction in order to perp wait racial divisions and class divisions and eth nick divisions. you have to isolate the support women so they maintain the purity of some group and exploit the women who are supposedly not the support women in order to create cheap labor. i'm sure that we were all having hea
because it is when the middle class is growing that the economy grows and everybody does well. much as the focus on corporate america. >> i think the commission also. it is a privilege to be here and speak with americans. a good barometer here to see if this was a good time are a bad time in america's economy -- go to a kids' soccer game on saturday and turn any parent on the sideline and say how are you feeling about the economy and i bet you you will hear some fear in that parents voice. fear regarding the few investments that some of us have in the stock market. did we just take a major hit with those investments? fear about how will we afford to send our kids to college. a fear as small-business owners on how we will bar any made to increase inventory or hire more people. the barometer will be resoundingly that our economy is hurting and the federal government has not provided the sound oversight that we need and that we deserve and we need reform to that end. john mccain, thankfully, has been one representing reform could two years ago, john mccain was the one who pushed so har
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
in discretionary spending cuts will drive the economy back into recession and cost 2 million jobs. on the other hand, it would go a long way to reducing the budget deficit. even by washington standards, that sounds important. to discuss the fiscal cliff, we have a panel of four budget watchers. format today will have each of our panelists speaking for about four minutes and i will ask questions and we will turn it over to the audience and give you a chance to ask questions. we have people watch it on c- span and the web. if you're not in the room and have questions, send them to public affairsaturbn,.org. we will start with donald. >> thanks to everybody for being here and raiding the rain to talk about the fiscal cliff. i will try not to ruin your lunch. we at the tax policy center put out a big report yesterday about the tax component of the fiscal cliff going through various details and what the effects would be on the american household. to want to make five basic points. the fiscal cliff really is bigger attacks point of view. if we remain there for all of 2013, it would be more than $500
a problem with government -- >> we had a downturn in the economy. we have hard times, people looking for work and not able to find jobs. >> 65% of federal spending going to individual payments. it may not sound good, but we have created a welfare state. >> to blame it all on president obama is even worse. to declare the president of the united states is manipulating so people will stay and vote democrat? i think that is the most ridiculous thing i have ever heard. such a cynical view of the presidency and of government. that cannot possibly reflect -- >> your response? >> i think a far better approach than a dependency is removing the barrier the federal government puts in place to small businesses and allowing entrepreneurs and small businesses to drive. >> what barriers? >> i am very happy to discuss the various. >> i wish she would. >> let him finish and make his point, then you can respond. >> what texans are looking for, and what is inherent in the east coast of texas, is that we are not looking for handouts. we're looking for the chance to the entrepreneur is, to work to achiev
to the economy. people in youngstown, ohio have stores boarded up because the economy is not doing well. it is not only the old industries, it is also the new ones. and the san jose, calif. they are complaining because they cannot export their high-tech quality to japan and other countries. people in the northwest are complaining about what is happening to the timber industry and the agricultural industry. things are not as great as the administration wants you to believe in their television commercials. my feeling quite frankly is that i have enough experience to see the problems, address them, and make the tough decisions with reference to the problem. >> despite the historic aspects of your candidacy, how do you account for the fact that the majority of women favor the reagan-bus ticket? >> i did not. let me say, i am not a believer in polls. let me say further, what we are talking about our problems that are facing the entire nation. they're not just problems facing women. the issues again for the campaign are the war-peace issues, the problem with deficits. we are facing $120 billi
. >> the ayatollah sees an economy being crippled. 50% fewer exports of oil. the currency is going in the tank. he sees the economy going into free-fall. he sees the world totally united in opposition. the president has met him a dozen times. he has spoken to netanyahu as much as he has spoken to anybody. just before he went to the un, i was in a conference call with the president talking for well over an hour. stark detail about what was going on. >> what does that mean? >> d.r. risk: malarkey. the secretary of defense -- the irish call is malarkey. we will not allow the iranians to get a nuclear weapon. when they get to the point where they can enrich uranium in half to put into a weapon, they do not have a weapon to put it into. but all calm down. iran is more isolated today than when we took office. it is totally isolated. i do not know what a world these guys are end. >> in spite of their opposition. they had given 20 waivers to this section. all i have to point to our results. >> can you tell the american people -- >> they are closer to being able to get another -- enough material to put it
and john mccain was on the look -- hook for six words -- "the fundamentals of the economy are strong." then things calmed down on our side. you start to go deeper into september and things begin to unravel. sarah palin gives a bad interview to katie couric around this time. and last night four years ago was the first debate. the pressure could not have been higher. on top of that, senator mccain was doing this dance between washington and the campaign trail. he had gone to washington for the bailout package and said he would not go to the debate unless there was a bailout package. we did not even know of john mccain would show up on the night. so that september, mitt romney had a tough month, people ask me all the time with a point to happen? , if you's pretty early think. think. 18 days with sarah palin seemed like a lifetime to me. got two lifetimes, that's like 40 days. a lot can happen on the campaign trail between now and then. it's a very interesting time. let's roll back a little. let's talk about the early days. first, my story. how i got to the campaign. i will go back to se
campaign and white house were aware that they had a very ugly economy and the comments really do not get reelected under these types of economies. they have always come across as hungrier and more aggressive than the romney campaign. in almost every respect. they were ready for a fight from the get go. >> this is what makes the debate so puzzling. the campaign has been hungry. look at the advertising they have been running. really smart advertising. >> who is running the obama campaign? david axelrod? obama? who is running the romney campaign? is the family intervening? >> from the white house, david pluft was the campaign manager in 2008 when they were underdogs. now the senior adviser in the white house. he has the last word on most things in the campaign and in the white house. ji messina, the cam -- the campaign manager in chicago runs an organization carried on the run inside, romney, ceo. when people look back at that campaign, a big factor people will look at is how a this as a person could have created a campaign that has such fuzzy lines of accountability, a campaign management
of everything, and agriculture, oil and gas, natural resources. our recreation economy is $3 billion a year in this state to make sure we have opportunities for recreation out there. do not tell me it can be just one industry. it has to be a bunch of industries out there. >> thank you. we have run out of time for questions. and we will give each candidate to minutes for closing statements about their campaign to be montana's representatives in the u.s. senate. senator tester will go first, followed by rep river. >> i want to thank everybody in the audience and on the panel and everyone who is listening tonight. how many people in this audience are from the silly -- the city of billings. raise your hand. thank you very much. congressman rewhberg is suing each and everyone of you. i have talked about montana and people working together. the first thing you do when you've got a grass fire, the firefighters put it out and they put their but on their line and you do not respond and say thank you by filing a lawsuit, which is exactly what he did. that is not moving the committee forward. it has b
issue is what are we doing on taxes on the constructive part of the economy. we have to adjust them. >> george bush in 1990 entered into a deal and it was supposed to be balanced. the trade-off was to reduce spending. the higher taxes, for sure. reducing spending, we are still waiting. the negotiations are complex and there are many pieces to it. everything could end up being on the table. but there's no question that you have to occur long-term medical care entitlement costs. the number one spending program in the federal government. and will have to be looked at the health care reform and a bunch of other things that are complex. you cannot do one without doing everything. >> briefly i want to ask each of you whether you are optimistic or pessimistic, the things you think need to be done to restore business competitiveness can be done over the course of the next four years, however wins the election on november 6? >> i am highly optimistic. 100% certain it can all be done. the question you're asking is will they? i think there is going to be enormous pressure from business communi
likely to trust us. as hot spots are growing abroad, the economy is not growing at home. that is the problem we have to focus on. the economy is growing slower than last year. last year it grew slower than the year before. all the obama is offering is more of the same. we have a big choice to make. do we want more stagnation that fosters dependency or do we want a growing economy that creates opportunities and jobs? [applause] in a nutshell, we need leadership. look at the guy over my shoulder right here. [applause] if you look at this man's life story, one word comes to mind. leader. this is a man who turned around the olympics, turned around struggling businesses. by the way, being successful in business is a of thing. there is nothing wrong with that. we want more people to be successful. we want more of you to have prosperity with jobs with higher take-home pay. we want people to grow. when america has a jobs crisis, it would be nice to have a job creator in the white house. this is a man who has proven to get things done. when he was governor of massachusetts, he cu
they spent $800 million on all kinds of different things to fix the economy. they spend the money and the jobs did not follow. what we got was that. when you talk about it in those terms, here's what the president sold to the american people on how to fix the economy. these were the results. not only did not create the jobs, but we have a lot of debt to pay off. we tried to hold elected officials to account for the record and also for the promises they have made. that is why politicians don't like super pacs because we're able to do this. >> living here between the new york and philadelphia media market, you will not see any of those. in 89 states, that is important to remember. there is it -- in eight or nine states, that is important to remember. there's a lot of money concentrated in a very small number of states. that is very important for everybody here to remember. campaign finance reform and the unintended consequences, that is one of my pet peeves, the unintended consequences with well-intentioned legislation. we want to open it up to questions. but did not want to become
that's the worst thing you can do for the poor is to have no economic growth and a terrible economy. the way you get the poor off the rolls is to get them a job. this president has done a terrible job in that regard. host: next phone call john republican. caller: he says, there's no reason to build roads in the suburbs when they put it in the cities. guest: sir, i'm not aware of that. you maybe referring to oneqrnsñf the transportation bills that passed. you confess that the funding mechanisms for those projects are very complicated. i'm not sure that i can be much help in your question. host: cleveland, ohio, democratic caller. caller: all you republicans keep saying the obama economic program didn't work. what happened, kennedy died, there was no control of the senate, you republicans filibusterrered 275 bills in 2010. they effectively killed the total obama economic agenda. we've had over the last four years the republican austerity. the vets jobs bill was filibusterrered. four republicans crafted the bill and when the bill came to the floor, 58 members on the floor, 42 rep
in this economy. that is one of the reasons we had last schools, about 38 schools submitted this round, where 10 or 12 years ago, we had close to 40 or 50. >> let's move to the format. tonight these two gentlemen will be seated, as were the vice presidential contenders in 2000. why is that? >> the commission has studied long and hard over the years and we think the nature and tenor of discourse changes when you are seated around a table. we recommend this time as we did four years ago that all of the debate other than the town hall meeting, which is different, which will be next week, all of them are seated at a table. four years ago, senator obama and senator mccain asked us to do one with the podium. they did the same this time with the governor and the president. we are not going to argue about the format as long as they don't touch the integrity of the format itself. we think a better format in getting full discussion of issues in depth of discussion of issues is when you are seated at a table, rather than standing behind a podium. >> no one is more aware than you of all the discussion, and
a deregulated economy and we have produced through low taxes, not high taxes, through deregulation the spirit of entrepreneurship, the individual going out and starting a business, the businessman or women willing to go out and risk their investments to start up a business and hire people. we have produced 17 million jobs in this country since 1982. deregulation as a form of political philosophy is a good philosophy. it's one that our opponents disagree with. they want a centralized government. but we believe in the market, we believe in the people and yes, there's a role of government and the role of government is to make sure that those safety and health and the welfare of the people is taken care of. and we'll continue to do that. >> senator bentsen? >> well, i think you see once again a piece of democratic legislation that's been passed to try protect the working men and women of america. and then you've seen an administration that came in and really didn't have it's heart in that kind of an enforcement. a good example of that is the environmental protection laws that we were talking abou
and regulations that it would be a huge boost to the economy. those two reasons still exist. i think they will still model through because the alternative is potentially so bad. i could be wrong. you will see good news, bad news. it will work -- it will not work. they cannot do it all at once. they have the will. the politicians say there is no plan be. -- plan b. >> let's just keep globetrotting for second. the international financial meetings in japan. one thing coming out is the imf predictions for the slowdown in global economic growth. alcoa announced this morning the drop-off of global demand for aluminum which is sending an indicator. are you seeing the same thing in your business operations? you are a truly international institutions. are using a sign a slowdown? >> not quite like that. europe is in a mild recession. the government is going to spend 50% of the money. that will not go down. asia is a slower but it is nothing mystical or different than your read about. united states is fundamentally a stronger than people think, in my opinion. in latin america, some are better
is to grow the economy and create jobs. it is a plan that is estimated to create 7 million jobs. we think the government taking 20% of the families and businesses income is enough. president obama thinks the government ought to be able to take as much as 44.8%. if you tax every person and successful small-business making over $250,000 at over 100%, you can only run a government for 98 days. there are not enough rich people and small businesses to tax to pay for all their spending. the next time you hear them say, do not worry about it, watch out, middle-class, the tax bill is coming to you. that is why we are saying, eight out of 10 businesses, they file their taxes as individuals, not as corporations. near where i come from, the canadians dropped their tax rate to 15%. the average tax rate on businesses is 25%. the president wants the top tax rate to go above 40%. two-thirds of our jobs come from small businesses. it does not pay for 10% of the deficit spending increases. lower tax rates across the board and close loopholes. we have three bottom lines. do not raise the deficit, do not ra
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